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Keep Fit Even at 40: Study Reveals Midlife Fitness Reduces Risk of Stroke

Lower Your Risk of Stroke Through Exercise Regardless of Age

Jogging
An elderly man exercises with a jog along the beach as surfers head into the ocean in La Jolla, California January 20, 2016 |

A recent study has revealed that people aged 45 to 50, who maintain a healthy lifestyle and keep track of their fitness, have 37 percent lower risk of suffering a stroke after the age of 65.

The World Health Organization reports that the number two of the top 10 causes of death in 2012 worldwide is stroke. In the US, stroke is number five cause of death of Americans by 2015. Also, 40 percent of stroke deaths in America are in men and 60 percent are in females. With these statistics, stroke is not something to laugh at.

When the supply of blood to the brain is interrupted or reduced, stroke occurs due to the brain not being able to get enough oxygen or nutrients. Stroke is a major cause of long-term disability.

"These findings support the unique and independent role of exercise in the prevention of stroke," said Jarett Berry, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, looked at nearly 20,000 people who received Medicare coverage between 1999 and 2000 and 800 stroke hospitalizations. It also revealed fit people have lower risk of high blood pressure and type-2 diabetes.

At least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 of vigorous exercise weeks has been recommended by the American Heart Association. Exercise routines recommended include aerobic and strengthening exercises. Aerobic exercises could be in the form of jogging, walking and biking while strengthening exercises could be done via lifting weights.

"It's never too late to exercise to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke," said Dr. Ambarish Pandey, a cardiology fellow at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He is also the lead researcher of the study, which had increased the hope of many to avoid the cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Ralph Sacco, chairman of neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, said it's never too late to start exercising to reap the benefits. He had reminded though to check with the physician before starting physical activity more vigorous than your usual.

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