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In historic low, only 38% extremely proud to be an American: Gallup

The American Flag
unsplash/Paul Weaver

A new Gallup poll has found that only 38% of adults in the United States say they are “extremely proud” to be American, the lowest percentage recorded since the analytics and advisory company began asking the question in 2001.

Gallup suggests the revelation may not be surprising given that the poll was conducted between June 1 and 20, at a time when “a pandemic-weary public is struggling with the highest U.S. inflation rate in more than four decades.” The survey was conducted among a random sample of 1,015 U.S. adults.

In addition, Gallup added, the poll was held soon after mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, which claimed 31 lives, including 19 children. It also preceded the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.

The 38% expressing extreme pride is four percentage points lower than in 2020 and nearly 20 points lower than it was a decade ago, according to the survey.

However, 65% of U.S. adults still express pride in the nation, the survey found. About 27% say they are “very proud,” another 22% say they are “moderately proud,” and 9% say they are “only a little.”

The combined 65% for those who are "extremely" or "very proud" is two points lower than in 2020. Only 4% say they are “not at all” proud.

The poll shows that Republicans (58%) continue to be ahead of Democrats (26%) and Independents (34%) in showing pride in being American.

It also reveals that 72% of men are "extremely" or "very proud" to be American, compared to 60% of women.

Age-wise, about 80% of Americans aged 55 or older are "extremely" or "very proud" of their nationality, and the percentage drops to 64% among those aged 35 to 54, and 48% among those aged 18 to 34.

Another Gallup survey, conducted around the same time, shows that only a quarter of U.S. adults have a great deal or quite a lot of confidence in the Supreme Court, the lowest since 1973.

In a Gallup survey in May, only 18% of American adults said they approved of the way Congress was handling its job.

Meanwhile, the city of Orlando, Florida, drew criticism over a newsletter that promoted the city's annual "Fireworks at the Fountain 2022" event.

“A lot of people probably don’t want to celebrate our nation right now, and we can’t blame them. When there is so much division, hate and unrest, why on earth would you want to have a party celebrating any of it?” the post read.

“But in all seriousness, you know in your heart, Fourth of July fireworks are amazing, especially when you are standing in 90° heat, 100% humidity, next to 100,000 of your closest friends. In that moment, something takes over and we all become united in an inexplicable bond. Yes, America is in strife right now, but you know what … we already bought the fireworks,” it added.

Christina Pushaw, press secretary for Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, responded by asking, “Yikes. City of Orlando, is this your official position on our country and on 4th of July?”

A local police union representing 800 officers also slammed the comments as "inflammatory and in poor taste."

Later, the city of Orlando said in a statement it “sincerely regrets the negative impact our words have had on some in our community.”

It continued, “We understand these words offended some of our residents, which was not our intent. We value the freedoms we have in this country and are thankful to the men and women who fought and continue to fight for those. We take pride in celebrating the 4th of July to express our gratitude to those men and women and honor the country we live in.”

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